Rotator Cuff Injury


Rotator Cuff injury is a common pain among the adults and are common and increase with age. These injuries may occur earlier in people who have jobs that require repeatedly performing overhead motions, such as painters and carpenters.


Physical therapy exercises can improve flexibility and strength of the muscles surrounding the shoulder joint. For many people with rotator cuff problems, these exercises are all that's needed to manage their symptoms.

Sometimes, rotator cuff tears may occur from a single injury. In those circumstances, people should seek medical advice quickly because they might need surgery.



Here I would like to add a very important note. Rotator Cuff injury can lead you to Frozen Shoulder symptoms.

Some information about the Frozen Shoulder.


Risk factors:

Certain factors may increase the risk of developing frozen shoulder.


Age and sex

People 40 and older, particularly women, are more likely to have frozen shoulder.


Immobility or reduced mobility

People who've had to keep a shoulder somewhat still are at higher risk of developing frozen shoulder. Restricted movement can be the result of many factors, including:

  • Rotator cuff injury

  • Broken arm

  • Stroke

  • Recovery from surgery

Systemic diseases

People who have certain diseases appear more likely to develop frozen shoulder. Diseases that might increase risk include:

  • Diabetes

  • Overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism)

  • Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism)

  • Cardiovascular disease

  • Parkinson's disease )



Anatomy


Your shoulder is made up of three bones: the upper arm bone (humerus), the shoulder blade (scapula), and the collarbone (clavicle). The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint: The ball, or head, of the upper arm bone fits into a shallow socket in the shoulder blade.






The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles that come together as tendons to form a covering around the head of the humerus. The rotator cuff attaches the humerus to the shoulder blade and helps to lift and rotate your arm. There is a lubricating sac called a bursa between the rotator cuff and the bone on top of the shoulder (acromion). The bursa allows the rotator cuff tendons to glide freely when you move your arm. When the rotator cuff tendons are injured or damaged, this bursa can also become inflamed and painful.

















Symptoms


The most common symptoms of a rotator cuff tear include:

  • Pain at rest and at night, particularly if lying on the affected shoulder

  • Pain when lifting and lowering your arm or with specific movements

  • Weakness when lifting or rotating your arm

  • Crepitus, or a crackling sensation, when moving your shoulder in certain positions

Tears that happen suddenly, such as from a fall, usually cause intense pain. There may be a snapping sensation and immediate weakness in your upper arm.

Tears that develop slowly due to overuse may also cause pain and arm weakness. You may have pain in the shoulder when you lift your arm, or pain that moves down your arm.

  • At first, the pain may be mild and present only when lifting your arm over your head, such as reaching into a cupboard. Over-the-counter medication, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or naproxen, may relieve the pain.

  • Over time, the pain may become more noticeable at rest and no longer goes away with medications. You may have pain when you lie on the painful side at night. The pain and weakness in the shoulder may make routine activities, such as combing your hair or reaching behind your back, more difficult.

It should be noted that some rotator cuff tears are not painful. These tears, however, may still result in arm weakness and other symptoms.




Treatment

Nonsurgical Treatment

In about 80 to 85% of patients, nonsurgical treatment relieves pain and improves function in the shoulder.

Nonsurgical treatment options may include:

  • Rest. Your doctor may suggest rest and limiting overhead activities.

  • Activity modification. Avoid any activities that cause shoulder pain.

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen can reduce pain and swelling.

  • Strengthening exercises and physical therapy. Specific exercises will restore movement and strengthen your shoulder. Your exercise program will include stretches to improve flexibility and range of motion. Strengthening the muscles that support your shoulder can relieve pain and prevent further injury.

  • Steroid injection. If rest, medications, and physical therapy do not relieve your pain, an injection of a local anesthetic combined with cortisone may be helpful. Cortisone is a very effective anti-inflammatory medicine; however, it is not effective for all patients. And if it is effective for you, there is no way to know how long the effects will last; it may be weeks, months, years, or possibly the rest of your life. On average, injections can be expected to provide pain relief in about two-thirds of patients for a period of at least 3 months.

A cortisone injection may relieve painful symptoms.

The chief advantage of nonsurgical treatment is that it avoids the major risks of surgery, such as:

  • Infection

  • Permanent stiffness

  • Anesthesia complications

  • Sometimes lengthy recovery time

The disadvantages of nonsurgical treatment are:

  • The size of the tear may increase over time.

  • You may need to limit activities.





Physical Therapy treatment: Strength and stretching exercise


I have found him and I think he has a good collection of exercise what will help you with the pain.




I hope with this blog I can help you again to understand your pain and how you can help yourself a bit to reduce the pain. If you have any question, please write me an email and I will be happy to help you.

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